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Australia Bans Violent Video Games

by on July 30, 2011
 

Australia continues its pointless political posturing over an issue so insignificant and inconsequential that it almost makes American gridlock democracy look desirable. Almost. Australia seems to be stuck where America was in the 1980s culturally, facing a retarded and moot battle over censoring violence for the good of the children (won’t somebody please think of the children!). Most recently, the awesome new Mortal Kombat has been banned in Australia, being considered such an evil influence on children that it must be prosecuted. What a mature, free country. What are you guys, the United Arab Emirates or something? The latest move by freedom suppressing fascists and would be arbiters of moral taste is to halt the introduction of the AO (adults only) rating in Australia, newly christened R18+. Why? I’m not sure, as this would supposedly make it more difficult for children to purchase violent video games. Here’s their reasoning,

… Mental Health Minister Helen Morton signing a petition in February 2010 against the classification change.

WA member for Swan Hills, Frank Alban, who also signed the petition, said he did not see the sense in having an R18+ classification for games that simulated rape and other extreme violence.

“The morality boundaries are being expanded … nothing good can come out of it,” he said.

“Exposure makes something that’s not acceptable now acceptable.”

Mr Alban said he believed the move was a way for game producers to widen their market and make more money.

Member for Southern River, Peter Abetz, who also signed the petition against the classification change, said he was disappointed with the decision.

Stop fucking with artistic freedom! If I wanted something truly foul, I’d go online anyway. That goes for you too, California. In case you readers didn’t know, California legislators (under the leadership of super prude Leland “Up-In-Your-Business” Yee) tried to ban the selling of violent video games to kids in California, and WAS SHUT DOWN by the Supreme Court for being unconstitutional. Go America (for once)!

“No doubt a state possesses legitimate power to protect children from harm,” said Justice Antonin Scalia, who wrote the majority opinion. “But that does not include a free-floating power to restrict the ideas to which children may be exposed.”

[Source]

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  • August 10, 2011 at 4:16 AM

    How much study did you put into this story, AT ALL? This seems to be info from like 2 years ago. Australia is finally getting an R18 rating in a few months, and it was only cause of stupid government rules that required all states to agree for this to happen.

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